Events

Civil War History Weekend

Join Our State in Wilmington June 6-8, 2014, to learn what life was like in North Carolina during the Civil War.

Civil War History Weekend

Join Our State’s Civil War Series writer Philip Gerard to learn what life was like in North Carolina during the years 1861 – 1865. Also Starring: Dr. Chris Fonvielle, Jr. — associate professor of History at UNC-Wilmington.

Your Weekend Package Includes:

  • Civil War seminar with Philip Gerard
  • Guided tour and “living history experiences” at The Bellamy Mansion, one of North Carolina’s most spectacular examples of antebellum architecture built on the eve of the Civil War and commandeered by Federal troops as their headquarters during the occupation of Wilmington.
  • Private tour of historic Oakdale Cemetery, an outdoor museum and arboretum since 1852 and burial place of many interesting people such as Mrs. Rose O’Neale Greenhow, a Confederate secret agent.
  • Lunch and tour of St. James Parish, an Episcopalian church founded in 1729 that was taken over by Federal troops during the final stages of the Civil War for use as a hospital.
  • Demonstration of Civil War-era wet plate collodion photography by historian and fine art photographer Harry Taylor.
  • Welcome Reception
  • Dinner cruise along the Cape Fear River aboard the Henrietta III
  • Breakfasts Saturday and Sunday
  • Two nights lodging at the Hampton Inn University

TOTAL PRICE: $675 per couple, all-inclusive

To reserve your space call the Hampton Inn at (910) 791-9899

For more information about the weekend, please call Amy Wood Pasquini at (800) 948-1409.

Civil War History Weekend Schedule

Friday, June 6, 2014

3 p.m. – 6 p.m. Our State Welcome
Hampton Inn University lobby and outdoor patio

4:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Civil War Photography Technique Display
Meet fine art photographer and historian Harry Taylor as he demonstrates Civil War wet plate collodion photography.

5 p.m. – 7 p.m. Whiskey Creek and Philip Gerard
Welcome reception with Philip Gerard and his band Whiskey Creek. Light hors d’oeuvres will be served.

Dinner on your own

Saturday, June 8, 2014

6 a.m. – 8 a.m. Breakfast in the lobby

8:15 a.m. Board buses at Hampton Inn University for Cape Fear Museum

9 a.m. – 9:45 a.m. Dr. Chris Fonvielle Civil War seminar

9:45 a.m. – 10:15 a.m. Brief overview tour of the Cape Fear Civil War-related exhibit

10:30 a.m. Divide into two groups
Group one goes to Bellamy Mansion. Group two goes to the Oakdale Cemetery. We will switch in the afternoon after lunch.

10:30 a.m – 12:00 p.m. Bellamy Mansion and Oakdale Cemetary tours
Bellamy Mansion – Guided tour and “living history experiences” at the Bellamy Mansion, one of North Carolina’s most spectacular examples of antebellum architecture built on the eve of the Civil War. After the fall of Fort Fisher in 1865, Federal troops commandeered the house as their headquarters during the occupation of Wilmington. Philip Gerard will be available for questions and discussion.

Private tour of historic Oakdale Cemetery – An outdoor museum and arboretum since 1852. Many interesting people are buried there including Mrs. Rose O’Neale Greenhow, a Confederate secret agent. Dr. Chris Fonveille to lead.

Noon departures for lunch and tour at St. James Parish
St. James Parish, an Episcopalian church founded in 1729 that was taken over by Federal troops during the final stages of the Civil War for use as a hospital.

1:30 p.m. Buses depart for Bellamy Mansion and Oakdale Cemetery

3:30 p.m. Departures for the Hampton Inn University from Bellamy Mansion and Oakdale Cemetery

4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Free time

5:30 p.m. Board buses for trip to the Henrietta III Dinner Cruise

6:15 p.m. Cruise departs

9:00 p.m. Board buses for trip back to the Hampton Inn University

Sunday, June 8, 2014

6 a.m. – 9 a.m. Breakfast in the lobby

9 a.m. – 10 a.m. “A Sunday Morning Salute and Farewell” with Philip Gerard
Hampton Inn University outdoor patio

About the Presenters:

Philip Gerard is currently writing “The Civil War – Life in North Carolina 1861 – 1865,” a series that began in 2011 in Our State magazine. He was born in 1955 and grew up in Newark, Delaware. He attended St. Andrew’s School in Middletown, Delaware. At the University of Delaware, he studied with fiction writer Thomas Molyneux, poet Gibbons Ruark, and nonfiction writer and editor Kevin Kerrane and earned a B.A. in English and Anthropology, graduating Phi Beta Kappa. After college he lived in Burlington, Vermont, tending bar and writing freelance articles, before returning to newspaper work in Delaware and then going west to study fiction writing at the Arizona writers workshop with Robert Houston, Vance Bourjaily, Richard Shelton, and others. He earned his M.F.A. in Creative Writing in 1981 and almost immediately joined the faculty at Arizona State University as a Visiting Assistant Professor and later as Writer in Residence. He remained at ASU until 1986, then taught for a brief time at Lake Forest College in Illinois before migrating to coastal North Carolina, where he had spent many happy summers during his teenage years roaming the Outer Banks of Hatteras and Ocracoke Islands. Gerard currently teaches in the BFA and MFA Programs of the Department of Creative Writing at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, which he chairs. His novels include Hatteras Light (Scribners 1986), Cape Fear Rising (Blair 1994) and Desert Kill (William Morrow 1994). His nonfiction books include: Brilliant Passage. . . a schooning memoir (Mystic 1989) and Creative Nonfiction — Researching and Crafting Stories of Real Life (Story Press 1996). Gerard, an avid musician, incorporates bluegrass, folk, country, and original compositions into his readings, playing six and twelve-string guitar, dobro, banjo, and pedal steel guitar. He lives on Whiskey Creek near the Intracoastal Waterway and sails his sloop Suspense on the Atlantic Ocean.

 

Chris E. Fonvielle, Jr. is a native of Wilmington, North Carolina, with a lifelong interest in American Civil War, North Carolina, Lower Cape Fear and Southern history. His in-depth research focuses on Civil War coastal operations and defenses, blockade running, and the navies. He has published numerous books about the Civil War. After receiving his B.A. in Anthropology at UNC-Wilmington, Fonvielle served as the last curator of the Blockade Runners of the Confederacy Museum. He subsequently received his M.A. in American history at East Carolina University, under the direction of Dr. William N. Still, Jr., and his Ph.D. from the University of South Carolina, where he studied with noted Civil War historian Dr. Thomas L. Connelly. Dr. Fonvielle returned to his undergraduate alma mater at UNC-Wilmington in 1996, where he now teaches courses on the Civil War, Wilmington and the Lower Cape Fear, the Old South and Antebellum America. He also teaches extended education courses on the history of the Lower Cape Fear through the university. (adapted from UNCW’s Department of History website)

 

Harry TaylorHarry Taylor is a fine art photographer based in North Carolina. Harry mostly works in the Wet Plate Collodion process, this involves large format cameras, up to 16×20 and on site processing in a portable darkroom. This work explores the American South; Harry’s home and base. Harry’s work has been featured in Haven, Garden and Gun, Our State, Coastal Living, Slate.com, Juxtapose, NPR radio pictures blog, Time LightBox, The Atlantic, The Paris Review, and most recently the Oxford American. In 2011, Harry was honored to be invited to the World-Renowned Sianoja Simposio International De Artist En Noja, Spain, as the sole representative from the United States.

 

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