Eastern N.C.

Water-Ways

Water Ways

If you wanted to fish or duck hunt in Currituck County and its namesake sound, you needed to know the man who knew the water. For visitors a long way from home, that man was Frank Carter, a beloved, trusted sporting guide for almost 50 years.
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edenton

Edenton

The South’s Prettiest Small Town reveals character through its women.
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Pea-Island-Life-Saving-Station-crew

Maritime Hero

By the time he became the first black keeper of a United States Life-Saving Service station, Richard Etheridge had overcome slavery, war, and racism.
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Mallory-Creek

River Runaways

For slaves, the struggle began long before the first shots of the Civil War. Now, the unrest and confusion of conflict open passage to freedom. (Volume 1, Part 4)
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Wilmington's-riverfront

A House Divided

Doctor Bellamy’s mansion and the beginning of the end of an era.
(Volume 1, Part 1)
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The-Eagle-Tavern-in-Historic-Halifax

Town Center

In colonial North Carolina, if you needed to mail a letter, have a tooth pulled, get a divorce, or launch a revolution, you went to a tavern. To get a sense of what you would have found inside one, take a trip to Historic Halifax.
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Buffalo-City-Rd.

The Rise and Fall of a Moonshine Capital

A chance detour leads to one man’s discovery of a once-thriving mill town long lost to the swamplands of the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge.
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Coolmore-Plantation

Tarboro Tradition

Coolmore Plantation is both a mansion and a museum. But to Joe Spiers, who lives here with his wife, Janet, it is both a connection to his family’s history and a structure that symbolizes his own endurance and strength.
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beaufort

Beaufort

Calling people in with its coastal beauty, the third-oldest town in North Carolina swells with history and friendly faces.
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A Kingdom Strange

A Kingdom Strange: The Brief and Tragic History of the Lost Colony of Roanoke by James Horn

But the last word from England’s island colony Roanoke — CROATOAN carved into the trunk of a tree in the Outer Banks — beckons to us across the centuries. Historian James Horn’s thoughtful, authoritative account of this settlement tells a story that refused to die among the Indians or the English.
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