A Year-Round Guide to Franklin and Nantahala

Discover the Outdoors From camping on the Outer Banks to practicing yoga on stand-up paddleboards to kayaking down Piedmont rivers, Jo Proia believes in the healing and empowering qualities of

Madison County Championship Rodeo

Discover the Outdoors From camping on the Outer Banks to practicing yoga on stand-up paddleboards to kayaking down Piedmont rivers, Jo Proia believes in the healing and empowering qualities of

Rosemary and Goat Cheese Strata

Discover the Outdoors From camping on the Outer Banks to practicing yoga on stand-up paddleboards to kayaking down Piedmont rivers, Jo Proia believes in the healing and empowering qualities of

3 Items for Your September To-Do List

Discover the Outdoors

From camping on the Outer Banks to practicing yoga on stand-up paddleboards to kayaking down Piedmont rivers, Jo Proia believes in the healing and empowering qualities of the outdoors. After eight and a half years spent working in outdoor recreation and education for women, Proia created Outdoor Women in January 2020, teaching activities such as kayaking, paddleboarding, hiking, and plant identification throughout the state to women of all experience levels. “Nature heals — mentally, emotionally, and physically,” Proia says. “We specialize in allowing an empowered, educated, and supportive environment for women to reconnect with that love of adventure and the outdoors.” — Liz Johnson

To learn more about Outdoor Women by Jo Proia, visit outdoorwomenbyjp.com.


At the Cherokee Heritage Festival, attendees can purchase handmade goods — like baskets created by Davy Arch, a nationally recognized Cherokee storyteller and artist — and watch performers like Cherokee hoop dancer Eddie Swimmer. photographs by Jennifer Callahan

Learn About Cherokee Culture

Cherokee Heritage Festival — Hayesville, September 18

Watch members of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians perform dances and demonstrations, browse handcrafted jewelry and art, and indulge in tasty fry bread at the Cherokee Homestead Exhibit.

(828) 415-1623
cccra-nc.org


Antique tobacco tins add a pop of color to a kitchen shelf. photograph by Stacey Van Berkel

Shop for Antiques

Looking for a one-of-a-kind North Carolina treasure? Start your search at one of these spots across the state.

Liberty Antiques Festival — Liberty, September 24-25

Find antique pottery, quilts, folk art, furniture, jewelry, and a variety of other items at the 100-acre Pike Family Farm during this two-day festival in Randolph County. About 400 vendors from 25 states will sell authentic items at this event — no crafts or reproductions allowed.

(800) 626-2672
libertyantiquesfestival.com

The Owl’s Nest — Lincolnton

Julie Horton, owner of The Owl’s Nest, describes the style of her downtown Lincolnton store as “Southern eclectic.” The shop has traditional antiques like furniture and china, plus newer items like an assortment of farmhouse-style decor.

(704) 740-2083
facebook.com/theowlsnestlincolnton

SuzAnna’s Antiques — Rolesville

Owned and operated by Jenny Sellars and her mother, SuzAnna’s has served customers for 17 years. “I seriously learn something new every day working at the shop,” Sellars says. SuzAnna’s sells Ball and Mason jars, garden tools, salt and pepper shakers, and much more.

(919) 844-2652
facebook.com/suzannasantique

Tar River Flea Market — Rocky Mount

Shoppers can find everything from earrings to guitars at this 15-acre flea market, which features more than 70 vendors. Grab a snack while shopping and pick up some fresh produce from the on-site farmers market.

(252) 442-2597
tarriverfleamarket.com

— Jordan Schultz

For more North Carolina antiques shops, click here.

This story was published on Aug 30, 2021

Our State Staff

Since 1933, Our State has shared stories about North Carolina with readers both in state and around the world. We celebrate the people and places that make this state great. From the mountains to the coast, we feature North Carolina travel, history, food, and beautiful scenic photography.