Front Street Brewery’s general manager Chris Levesque, brewmaster Kevin Kozak, and marketing director Ellie Craig, respond to our original “9 Beers Every North Carolinian Should Try.” Check out their top picks below. 

1. Jam Session • NoDa Brewing Co. 

Description: Copper, hazy, orange in color. Mild & hoppy, but with bright, juicy flavors of tangerine, pineapple, mango, and something lemony.

 

2. Dark Cloud • Mother Earth Brewing

photo: ncbeer.org

photo: ncbeer.org

Description: Deep Mahogany. Bready, nutty & malty, but clean.

 

3. Cackalacky • Fullsteam Brewery

Description: Pours clear and golden. Palatable with slight spice from ginger. Crisp and tangy.

 

4. Scottish Ale • White Street Brewery

photo: UnTappd

photo: UnTappd

Description: Nice tan head on this beer. Layers of malt, but more sessionable than a standard Scottish at 5.5% ABV. Clean. 

 

5. Amberjack ESB • Front Street Brewery

Photo: Untappd

Photo: Untappd

Description: We had to throw one of our own in here! This beer is balanced & easy-drinking. Amber in color and malt forward with a balanced, hoppy finish.

 

6. Rickshaw Rye IPA • Crank Arm Brewing

crank arm rickshaw

Photo: Untappd

Description: Hoppy, Spicy and Robust with balanced citrus notes.

 

7. Olsch • Outer Banks Brewing

photo: Untappd

photo: Untappd

Description: This beer is true to the style. Plain and simple. Also, we can drink 100 of them.

 

8. Cold Mountain • Highland Brewing Company 

photo: ncbeer.org

photo: ncbeer.org

Description: Bright Amber Winter Warmer with toasted nutty malt flavors and seasonal spices like cinnamon, clove and nutmeg.

 

 9. Mother Shucker Oyster StoutNoDa Brewing Co./Front Street Brewery Collaboration

mother shucker

photo: Untappd

Description: Ok, ONE more of ours, but it’s a collaboration that we do FOR N.C. BEER MONTH! This roasty and toasty delicious brew incorporates Stump Sound Oysters from our great state – or at least our coast. The oysters are first shucked. The shells are pressure washed and added to the mash, which gives the beer a chalky, yet silky mouthfeel. The meat from the bushel of oysters is added to the end of the boil and the result is a rich, roasty stout with a slightly briny finish.
 

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Erin Reitz is the digital content specialist at Our State.