A Year-Round Guide to Franklin and Nantahala

Yield: 6 servings. 2 cups chopped tomatoes 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons unsalted butter

Madison County Championship Rodeo

Yield: 6 servings. 2 cups chopped tomatoes 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons unsalted butter

Rosemary and Goat Cheese Strata

Yield: 6 servings. 2 cups chopped tomatoes 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons unsalted butter

Tomato Shortcakes with Vidalia Onion Jam

biscuits

Yield: 6 servings.

2 cups chopped tomatoes
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 Vidalia onions, peeled and thinly sliced
2 garlic cloves, peeled and minced
2 tablespoons sugar
3 tablespoons white wine vinegar
2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
Biscuits
1 (5.2-ounce) package
Garlic & Fine Herbs Boursin

In a small bowl, toss tomatoes with 1 tablespoon of olive oil and the lemon juice. Season to taste with salt and pepper and set aside.

In a large skillet over medium-low, heat the butter and remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil.

Add onions, season with some salt and pepper, and cook until golden brown, stirring occasionally, about 10 to 15 minutes.

Add in garlic and sugar and cook for 1 minute.

Stir in vinegars, scraping up any browned bits, and cook until liquid has evaporated, about 5 minutes.

Let cool to room temperature.

To assemble shortcakes: Split each biscuit in half and spread some Boursin on both sides. Spoon some tomato mixture over each and top with a heap of onion jam.

print it

This story was published on Aug 28, 2014

Community Cookbook Series

Community Cookbook Series

For several years, Our State featured recipes from the pages of community and church cookbooks from around North Carolina. These dishes continue to be among some of our most popular and enjoyed.