Scott Huler

Huler is the senior staff writer at Duke magazine and a Piedmont Laureate Emeritus. He has written for such newspapers as the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Philadelphia Inquirer, and the Los Angeles Times and magazines including Backpacker, Fortune, and Child. His award-winning radio work has been heard on "All Things Considered" and "Day to Day" on National Public Radio and on "Marketplace" and "Splendid Table" on American Public Media, and he sometimes serves as guest host on "The State of Things" on WUNC-FM. He is the author of six books, most recently On the Grid.

Eats

What Makes Us Southern: Pimento Cheese

Did you know those spicy pimentos were first mixed in to protect fresh cheese from flies? Did you know the spread’s origins may actually be from up North? But then our companies — Star Foods in Burlington, Ruth’s Salads in Charlotte — began making it, and then we all started eating it, and before long, pimento cheese belonged to us.

Restaurant

An Introduction to Frying

My first weekend in North Carolina included a trip to the State Fair, and there I learned a thing so important that it sounds absurd. But it’s true: The thing about fried foods — and I had to move to North Carolina to learn this — is they will solve the world’s problems if you let them. OK — an extreme claim, but stay with me. We’ll see if I can’t convince you.

History

The Big Chip: Dorton Arena

Every year thousands of people at the North Carolina State Fair walk by Dorton Arena, not realizing the building is one of the state’s most ambitious — and historically significant — pieces of architecture.

August 2013

On Warm Days, Screen Doors Define Southern Culture

Its mission may seem simple — keep out bugs and let in breeze — but on a sultry summer day, a screen door is sublime. Comprising little more than wire mesh, a wooden frame, and a handful of hardware, it creates a barrier and an invitation, and an unmistakable sound that defines summer.

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