Leigh Ann Henion

Henion is a writer and photographer based in western North Carolina. Her essays and articles have appeared in Washington Post Magazine, Smithsonian, Oxford American, Orion, Preservation, and a variety of other publications. She has garnered a number of accolades for her work, including a Lowell Thomas Award, and her stories have been noted in three editions of The Best American Travel Writing. Her debut book – Phenomenal – was published by Penguin Press in March 2015.

Sports

Life Lessons Learned Through the Elements of Archery

Archery is a skill that can take a lifetime to master. But its biggest lesson is also the simplest: By pulling back the bowstring, you learn how to let go.

Nature

The Goat Whisperers of Roan Mountain

With the help of human herders, some hungry goats are saving the sensitive balds of Roan Mountain.

Western

City Portrait: Boone

Welcome to the Southern mountain town whose personality is in its precipitation.

Western

High Country Holiday Travel Handbook

Take the guesswork out of your holiday fun this year with our guide to some of the High Country’s best festive seasonal events.

Western

Asheville Holiday Travel Handbook

Take the guesswork out of your holiday fun this year with our guide to some of Asheville’s best festive seasonal events.

January 2015

Blowing Rock Snowman Creates Winter Magic

Even when there are no clouds, Steve Stanley, mountain manager of Appalachian Ski Mountain, makes so much snow that sometimes surrounding roads are coated with the stuff.

Western

20 Best-Kept Secrets of the NC High Country

North Carolina’s High Country — composed of six mountain counties — is such a well-known tourist destination you might think you’ve seen all there is to see there. But if you’ve spent any time in the area, you know it’s more gravel road than beaten path. Here, we reveal twenty of the High Country’s best-kept secrets to reintroduce you to a region you thought you already knew.

Western

In Search of the Brown Mountain Lights

Are the mysterious lights people have seen around Brown Mountain a natural phenomenon? Extraterrestrial orbs? Shared hallucinations? An elaborate hoax? Regardless of their origin, the legend continues to grow with each successive generation – year after year, night after night.